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This section of the website is for UK healthcare professionals only. If you are not a healthcare professional, please click here.

Diabetes

Updated on 26/04/2018

DIABETES

Life re-begins at 65 years old. Should your T2DM care too?

Turning 65 years old indicates the start of a new era, with social, environmental, psychological and physical changes. Many changes are positive, such as more free time to spend with family, and senior discounts on everything from travel to tap-dancing classes.

But for people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), there are also new challenges.

After the age of 65 years old, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) can present new challenges
Fears around T2DM can increase with age

People with T2DM over 65 years old can face increasing fears around their condition…

People in this age group have reported increasing fears, including:1

  • night and daytime hypoglycaemia
  • amputation
  • blindness
  • progressing to insulin

These fears may affect their daily activities and how they choose to live.

…and increasing risk of complications that may affect their treatment

Higher risks of comorbidities in people aged ≥65 years can lead to additional complications for healthcare professionals when making treatment decisions.

In people with T2DM aged over 65 years old:

  • Over 60% have co-morbid CV disease2
  • Over 60% have chronic kidney disease3
  • Approx 3x more likely to have a hospital admission due to hypoglycaemia4
Fears around T2DM can increase with age
TREND UK: Advice written by diabetes nurses
TREND UK logo

Helping people aged 65+ enjoy a new phase of life

TREND UK, a group of nurses working in diabetes care, have developed simple, reader-friendly materials specifically designed to help you support older people with type 2 diabetes.

Image of people over 65 with type 2 diabetes enjoying life

References

  1. Quandt SA et al. J Appl Gerontol. 2013;32(7):783–803.
  2. Iglay K et al. Curr Med Res Opin. 2016;32:1243–1252.
  3. Bailey RA et al. BMC Research Notes. 2014;7:415
  4. Zaccardi F et al., Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2016; 4: 677-685.

Supporting documentation

100 mg
Prescribing Information | Summary of Product Characteristics | Patient Information Leaflet

50 mg
Prescribing Information | Summary of Product Characteristics | Patient Information Leaflet

25 mg
Prescribing Information | Summary of Product Characteristics | Patient Information Leaflet

DIAB-1247350-0040 | Date of Preparation: April 2018