This section of the website is for UK healthcare professionals only. If you are not a healthcare professional, please click here.
This section of the website is for UK healthcare professionals only. If you are not a healthcare professional, please click here.
 

Mothers' education can impact diabetic kids

Manas Mishra, Reuters

Published: 28 June 2019

All our news articles are sourced from and licenced by NewsCred. Some of the units and values provided in this article are from sources outside the UK. For UK guidance on the management of diabetes, please refer to NICE or your local guidelines.

Family background can matter for the health of diabetic children, according to researchers in Denmark who found young patients' blood sugar control was linked with the level of education their mothers had attained.

Mother talking to young child about healthy choices

"One of the first explanations that comes to mind is that unequal access to healthcare may be a factor linking family background and blood sugar levels," said study leader Nick Nielsen from the department of economics at University of Copenhagen.

But studying people in Denmark, which has universal tax-financed access to healthcare, helped cancel out that factor, he told Reuters Health.

Nielsen and his team analysed data on 4,079 children who were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes between 2000 and 2013. In type 1 diabetes, the rarer form of the disease, the body's immune system mistakenly kills the beta cells in the pancreas that make and release the hormone insulin. Type 1 diabetes requires treatment with insulin injections.

The children were divided into 4 groups, depending on their mother's highest level of education. Altogether, 1,643 had mothers who hadn't gone to college, 1,548 had mothers who completed a vocational or 2-year college course, 695 had mothers with a bachelor's degree and 193 had mothers with a master's degree.

The researchers found that levels of so-called glycated haemoglobin, or HbA1c, which reflects blood sugar control over the previous three months, went down as the mothers' education level went up.

The normal range for HbA1c is 4.3% to 5.8% - but that range is difficult to achieve in diabetics. The American Diabetes Association recommends that children with type 1 diabetes strive to stay below 7.5%.

In the current study, HbA1c levels averaged 7.6% in children of mothers with advanced degrees, 7.9% in children of women with bachelor's degrees, 8.2% in children whose mothers graduated from vocational or 2-year colleges and 8.4% in children of mothers with no more than a high school degree.

Children of better-educated mothers also had lower rates of a dangerous condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis and lower rates of dangerously low blood sugar that can result from overdoses of insulin.

Differences in how often children’s blood sugar levels were checked during the day were likely to explain a large part of the disparities, the authors say.

Children of the most highly educated mothers had the highest number of daily blood glucose tests, while those with a high school education or less had the lowest.

Other potential explanations, the authors write, are that mothers with higher education may be more capable of helping manage diabetes and could help their children control their disease.

Links between patient education or socioeconomic status and compliance with treatment has been shown in older studies too.

The study is limited because it was not possible to get information on all mothers and their children in the registries.

Still, the researchers write in Diabetes Care, "For clinicians and policymakers, our results suggest that it may be beneficial to provide extra support to the least privileged children during the first few years of diabetes."

It would also be helpful if healthcare professionals help form patient groups, Nielsen says.

"In these groups, families could help support each other outside the clinic. We think that this increased decentral support could be valuable due to the importance of peer support and "everyday" advice and knowledge sharing," Nielsen added.

This article was written by Manas Mishra from Reuters and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Minor grammatical and translational editorial changes may have been made to this article by MSD, which has no impact on the content of the article. This is to ensure all articles remain as relevant as possible to UK healthcare professionals.

GB-NON-01233 | Date of Preparation: August 2019

Image div
Rating

Published: 11 August 2019

Thousands of people in England at risk of contracting type 2 diabetes will receive wearable tech to help monitor their exercise level, the NHS has said.

Read more
Image div
Rating

Published: 3 July 2019

People under 35 years old are ignoring warnings about sun exposure and skin cancer because they believe tanning makes people more attractive.

Read more
Image div
Rating

Published: 6 June 2019

NHS England has announced that nearly three quarters of a million patients are set to benefit from new world-leading innovations on the...

Read more
Image div
Rating

Published: 7 July 2019

More than a dozen NHS Trusts are taking the Government to court to argue that they should have an 80% reduction in business rates – the same discount given to private hospitals and fee-paying...

Read more
Image div
Rating

Published: 1 July 2019

Screening programmes will be overhauled and diagnosis made faster and more accurate with...

Read more
Image div
Rating

Published: 16 July 2019

The NHS Confederation report Chairs and Non-Executive Directors in the NHS did not give a fair picture of what is actually going on in the health service today...

Read more
Image div
Rating

Published: 19 June 2019

The world of healthcare is changing and with it our approach to understanding the concept of patients and doctors, ways of delivering care and building a better relationship between those...

Read more
Image div
Rating

Published: 28 June 2019

Family background can matter for the health of diabetic children, according to researchers in...

Read more
Image div
Rating

Published: 13 July 2019

If your patients have diabetes, you know how easy it is for them to injure their feet — without even realising...

Read more